Traffic Enforcement and Accident Investigations

Traffic UnitThe Bloomfield Township Police Department's Traffic Investigations Unit is dedicated to traffic enforcement. Because the Unit's primary assignment responsibility is traffic enforcement, traffic officers shoulder the fundamental duty of pro-active enforcement through violation issuance. Using their training and experience as well as sophisticated equipment, these officers analyze traffic patterns and enforce the traffic laws to prevent traffic problems and accidents. The Radar Trailer, a mobile speed monitor, is a valuable tool for driver education in subdivisions and in areas where it has been demonstrated that speeding vehicles are a concern. The radar trailer's computer also compiles traffic statistics and tabulations used to identify specific traffic issues.

Officers appointed to the Traffic Investigations Unit prepare for the assignment by attending Michigan State University's rigorous Accident Investigation Program, which includes instruction in physics and engineering. This training prepares the accident investigator to collect physical evidence and data, evaluate the roadway and accident scene, calculate speeds synthesized from vehicle damage and other accident scene measurements, and ultimately reconstruct the accident. Some officers have attained the prestigious status of Accident Reconstructionist. To aid in traffic reconstruction, traffic officers also use the latest technology, such as the Vericom 2000-brake test, speed-measuring computer, and damage crush measuring gauges.

New Traffic Signals Coming Soon to Oakland County

The Oakland County Road Commission will be introducing new traffic lights that will make intersections safer and reduce traffic delays. However, drivers must know how to properly use them! Please click on the links below to learn more. Remember, as a motorist you are responsible to observe all traffic laws.

This document is available to view in PDF format. Left Hand Turn Signals
This document is available to view in PDF format. About the RCOC

For additional information about these new traffic lights, visit the projects website.

Motor Carrier Enforcement

To prevent serious road damage caused by overweight trucks, the Bloomfield Township Police Department has trained several officers in Motor Carrier Enforcement. These officers are responsible for the enforcement of many complex laws pertaining to commercial motor vehicles (any vehicle with a gross weight over 10,000 lbs.). They investigate and verify that commercial drivers are properly qualified to drive a particular vehicle. The officers are also responsible for inspecting commercial motor vehicles to make sure that they are in compliance with the laws and that they are safe to be on the roadway with other motorists. Motor Carrier Officers are trained and certified in weight enforcement and are equipped to weigh trucks on portable scales. If trucks are over the weight limits, causing damage to Township roads, the officers fine the offenders.

Traffic Tickets: FAQ

Officer writing ticket1. How can you get me on radar when you were going in the other direction?
The radar or speed measurement device is designed to receive the speeds of vehicles which are approaching the radar field from the opposing direction and while the police car is being driven by the officer. The computer part of the radar system will automatically subtract the police car's speed from the speed measurement of the oncoming citizen vehicle.

2. I want to contest my traffic citation. What do I need to do?
You must promptly contact the 48th District Court at 248.647.1141 or the Court in whose jurisdiction you were issued the violation (usually listed on the back side of your copy of the ticket). The court will instruct you on how to proceed.

3. Do I get points on my driving record for traffic tickets?
Most traffic tickets have a point value assessed to the specific violation. Points are assessed by the Secretary of State. View the Michigan Secretary of State's Offense Code which includes point value of each traffic offense. 

4. Will the Secretary of State take away my license because of tickets?
The Secretary of State will review a driver's record, and likely send a warning letter when a driver obtains 6 points on the driving record. A driver with 12 points or more may be suspended or have driving privileges restricted.

5. Will the traffic ticket affect my insurance rates?
All insurance companies request driving records from the Secretary of State. Insurance companies determine an insured driver's rate based on tickets, accidents and other data. Contact your own insurance company for more information.

6. What traffic tickets/violations are 'waivable'?
There are only two violations that can be waived, signed off, or certified by a police officer -- violations for NO LICENSE ON PERSON and for DEFECTIVE EQUIPMENT. For additional information, contact the 48th District Court at 248.647.1141.

Reporting Accidents

Officer with tape measurementDrivers involved in automobile accidents should telephone the local police department to report the accident. Unless there are injuries or a circumstance that merits immediate police response, drivers or passengers need not dial 911. Because Bloomfield township police officers respond to all accidents, regardless of how minor, it is generally recommended that the vehicles not be moved from the scene unless absolutely necessary. Drivers may wish to drive to the police department to report their accident in person, but only if both parties agree as to the facts and circumstances of the accident.

Reporting Accidents: FAQ

1. Why do both drivers have to be present with their vehicles to make an accident report?
Michigan law requires that the police officer complete the accident form in full and that the department immediately forward the report to the Director of State Police. By having both vehicles and drivers present during the interview and investigation stage of the reporting process, it is assured that all information receives equal consideration in determining the cause of the accident.

2. If I am involved in a minor traffic accident and the other driver suggests that we exchange information now and report the accident to the police later, what should I do?
Part of the Michigan law that addresses accidents requires that you exchange your name, vehicle owner's name, address, and the registration number of the vehicle. The law also states if the apparent extent of damage totals $400.00 or more that you shall immediately report the accident to the police. Bloomfield Township Police Department requires that if an accident is reported at a later time at the police station, all drivers and vehicles involved must be present at the same time to complete an accident report.

3. I didn't receive a ticket, so why does my insurance company say I have points for my accident?
Most insurance companies have formulated their own point system - not to be confused with Secretary of State's point system - which assists the insurance company in what rate is charged for your particular automobile insurance policy. The insurance company may assign points on your insurance record if you were determined to be at fault in an accident, even if the officer did not issue you a ticket. Drivers involved in automobile accidents should telephone the local police department to report the accident. Unless there are injuries or a circumstance that merits immediate police response, drivers or passengers need not dial 911. Because Bloomfield township police officers respond to all accidents, regardless of how minor, it is generally recommended that the vehicles not be moved from the scene unless absolutely necessary.